Campaign for Human Development Annual Collection

The Sunday before Thanksgiving, Catholic Churches take up a second collection for the Campaign for Human Development. They implore us to consider the plight of others as a Catholic and moral thing to do. According to Life Site News, a little investigation reveals that the collection isn’t always in line with Catholic precepts when they divide up the collection among the needy. In fact, some of the recipients support groups and intentions that are very much out of line with the Church. Who decides where this money goes and why is it okay to consider ourselves a pro-life community when the donations from Catholics in the pews may be supporting abortion and more?

https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/us-bishops-catholic-campaign-for-human-development-continues-to-fund-pro-ab

Spiritual Needs . . .

I was told once that the physical needs of a family have to be met first . . . then you can work on the spiritual. We have to provide the basics to see that our children are healthy and well-fed, but the physical needs the world is advertising today exceeds actual need and is self-centered want.
To meet the ‘needs’ of a family, mothers are competing in the workforce. Although I’m not well-versed in economics, it seems to me that the more people who require jobs, the less good jobs there are available. And if a husband isn’t making enough to support his family, then the mother probably has to get a job. Equal rights looks rather unbalanced from this viewpoint.
All right, you might say, so a man has to work harder for his paycheck. What’s wrong with a woman grabbing her share of the paychecks being handed out? It’s fair competition.
One of the first things to go is respect. If a female wants to compete in a ‘man’s’ world, she should expect to be treated differently. You can’t have it both ways. You lose a bit of what makes each gender unique.
If you are a single woman, you can cope with the pressure, overtime and exhaustion. What if you are a mother in the workplace? Now who gets hurt?
A look around the world today will tell you that many mothers aren’t on duty. No matter how you try, you can’t handle two, full-time jobs. Motherhood is not an eight to five job..
In order to keep your children happy and maintain your ‘freedom’ to work, you keep them supplied with the latest and greatest to satisfy their physical needs. If you aren’t home, you don’t have the time to work on the spiritual. And the longing for physical wants far exceeds any desire for the spiritual unless this is nurtured . . . but who has time?
I knew a couple who put off starting a family until they could afford a boat. They earned their boat, had a baby and soon divorced. They both worked, the baby was in day care and they really didn’t have a family. The boat didn’t hold them together. In fact, it was something to argue over in the divorce proceedings. And the baby continued in day care because now the mother had to work.
I think that if most working mothers sat down and figured out the actual cost to them, spiritually and physically, of working, they might reconsider. Of course, there is always the ‘world’ telling them they have a right to find themselves so number crunching might not change their minds. And many of the husbands of today are products of working parent homes and used to the ‘bounty’ two salaries can bring. No one seems to know anymore when their physical needs have been met and exceeded. They keep trying to fill a void that only God can ultimately satisfy.
I know many of us ‘stay home’ mothers are regarded as being somewhat selfish and lazy. We stay home most of the time, don’t have the hassle of PTA and car pools, and seldom worry about whether our clothes are totally fashionable. Our own relatives even wonder about us!
Well, I guess as long as we are being considered backward, we might as well continue on that path and see first to the spiritual needs of our family . . . then we can work on the physical – together, as a family

Pope Alexander VI

Did some research and our current papal/cardinal scandals are truly bad but, in some respects, the grand prize for having been a really awful pope goes to Rodrigo Borgia. Just the Borgia name clues one into the thought that all might not have been well with this person in charge of anything.

Ridrigo Borgia had a ‘leg up’ on climbing the papal ladder as his uncle was Pope Calixtus III. Most likely, given his papal connection, getting through the various church ranks to his highest title in the church was made easier with the nepotism involved. As he made his way through the ranks, he managed to accumulate a great deal of wealth, too. No tithing for him! In 1492 whilst Columbus was sailing the ocean blue, he greased a few palms, called in some favors and purchased his place in the papacy. Bribery came in handy for getting the better of two other ‘claims’ to the throne.

The crowned Pope Alexander was pretty rotten to the core. He provided the world with seven illegitimate children by way of his mistresses. The church paid for their expenses and he endowed them with funding at the church’s expense. Living a rather plush life at the expense of the Church was, well expensive. When he needed to replenish the cash flow, he established new cardinals in return for money. Another ‘successful’ ploy was to arrest and jail rich people on imagined charges or murder them and abscond with their wealth.

It seems that Alexander VI was never considered godly (Go figure, right?) or in line with the Church and all things lawful. The only ‘virtues’ that can be said about him was his greedy ambition and lust for money and power. The orderly government of the City of Rome he bribed his way into, was left in complete shambles and disrepair.

“Now we are in the power of a wolf, the most rapacious perhaps that this world has ever seen. And if we do not flee, he will inevitably devour us all.” By Giovanni de Medici (Pope Leo X)

My Ongoing Peeve of the Day!

Many churches now distribute both the Body of Christ and the Precious Blood of Christ at Communion time. Many prefer both thinking that one without the other ‘won’t work’ and will, somehow, be lacking in full graces. I’ve been reprimanded on this topic after Mass.

Being of the more conservative mindset, we find our grace, solace, and mercy in receiving the Host and then going quietly back to our pew to offer our prayers and thanksgiving . . .

It doesn’t quite work that way these days. We receive Communion and five feet away a line forms for those who wish to receive under both Species. Okay, fine, right? Uh, not quite. Since we don’t get in line for the reception of the Precious Blood of Christ, we can’t kneel down in our pew because other people sharing our pew are still in line waiting for the Blood of Christ so we stand up against the wall and wait and wait for them to return. By the time we kneel down in our pew, it is almost time to sing the processional and out we go.

Today, there were more than usual waiting against the wall for the other pew dwellers to come back from the second line. Now a another procedure seems in place. Our pew is now completed and we try to get in to kneel BUT the second-line receivers take away our right of way and won’t pause long enough to let us return to our pew and prayers. After several pushed past, I finally stepped in front of the next one and with much surprise, she stopped and said, “Oh, you go on ahead!” like she had bestowed a favor on us.

Another interesting aspect is that while we are waiting against the wall (I was standing over the air vent and don’t want to talk about it!), people we know stop to say ‘good morning’, grin at us, or even try to chat a bit. I guess they are still in a good mood from their excessive peace signing earlier.

Not sure what can be done about this except pray for a Latin Mass to open up closer to home but I bet we aren’t the only one with most of our after-Communion thanksgiving being, “Whew, finally back in our pew!”

God vs. Gold

When we plan a budget, money seems to be the center of our planning! We make extensive calculations as to where, when and why our money will be spent. We have today to work with, tomorrow to think about and the distant future to consider. We sometimes deal with money needs and disbursement first in our life with everything else coming in second or as an after thought. The world tells us we need gold or it’s equivalent to survive.

If it is to be God’s Will, many of us will have a long life here on this earth. And if we acknowledge God’s Will in our lives, we will realize that without God, we are nothing and can do nothing. Why then do people spend so much of their lives seeking the gold first and giving secondary importance to the spiritual gold needed to attain eternal life?

Although, as modern day Catholics, we do not worship pagan gods, do we ever stop to consider that some of our pursuits are in the nature of idol worship? As responsible parents, we see to the care of our families. The greater of this burden, naturally, falls on the husband and father who needs to earn the living in order to provide for the family. Sometimes it seems that people get caught up in attaining money and material comforts and forget to work on the necessary requirements of the soul. A father’s burden is difficult as he has to balance the material care of his family’s needs with the spiritual nourishment of their souls. The mother has the job of maintaining the home life and reinforcing the nonphysical aspects of preparing their children’s souls for their final judgment day.

Needs is the divisive word here. What one person determines to be a need, may be unimportant to another. Do we judge others by what we want or by what brings them happiness and the hope of heaven? Are the needs we think important required for a successful life here on earth?

Financial situations go up and down. Life has struggles every day, some exceedingly trying, others annoying. What do we use to face this day-to-day crisis of being human beings? Look around and see what people hold most dear. And I will bet it is not usually a prayer and an hour in church!

Life is a search for the gold. We need to decide which gold will improve our life’s situation. Money can certainly ease us through our earthly life but could distract us from our ultimate purpose in life and slide us right past heaven. The road to heaven is not an easy climb whereas downward descents usually go rather quickly and without thought. It is very sad when you hear people say that God doesn’t really want us to struggle. Christ’s life on earth was certainly contrary to that thought!