University of Berkeley – Haven of Free Speech!

The University of Berkeley Campus lit up in self-righteous indignation recently as protesters made it known that they disagreed with the scheduled talk by Milo Yiannopoulos. Violent protests actually shut down Milo’s talk and security had to get him and his crew safely away as there were threats of possible bodily harm. You have to wonder exactly what these student ‘intelligentsia were, in reality, protesting and how would Milo Yiannopoulos’ talk deny them of any personal rights.

According to the United States First Amendment to the Constitution, we are allowed:

1. Freedom of speech which means the right to give a talk on just about any subject without threat of violence or being shut down.

2. We have a right to peaceably assemble which is what Milo and his audience were attempting to do in a civilized manner.

Basically, in all things except physical or character harm to another, Milo’s talk should have been able to proceed as planned. If you follow the news, this did not happen and the Berkeley Campus was battered, burned, and property destroyed even after the talk was cancelled. The University of California Berkeley – the site of the student Free Speech Movement of the 1960’s protested free speech. Whatever strength the Berkeley students might have evidenced in the 1960’s was certainly watered down to nothing during their rabid protest against another person’s right to speak and fellow students to listen.

Along with the First Amendment rights so blatantly disregarded on the Berkeley Campus, many other personal rights were ignored.

There were no arrests during the protest even as property was damaged and well-being of others threatened. Don’t people have an unbiased right to police protection?

Freedom from bodily harm was threatened. There is video of a young woman who was attacked and sprayed with pepper spray because she supported the President of the United States. Isn’t she allowed to support the standing President of the United States? What right does someone have to hurt another person because they disagree with them?

What about the people who wished to listen to Milo Yiannopoulos’ talk? Doesn’t every citizen have a right to do so without threat?

What about the administration of the college? Parents who send their children to college do expect there to be some element of safety there.

Strange, too, that so many protesters aka rioters appeared so quickly and with so much organization. It’s almost like they had been paid to do it . . Of course, that could have been determined early on if the police had started making arrests and checking student ID cards.

If you stop to think about the situation, it might be a civil liberties case needed to rectify the Berkeley problem. We do have the First Amendment but everyone has civil rights guaranteed to them, too.

Musings From Another Deplorable

A great one found on the Internet and shared by a friend:

I was born white, which now, whether I like it or not, makes me a racist. I am a fiscal and moral conservative, which by today’s standards, makes me a fascist. I am heterosexual, which according to gay folks, now makes me a homophobe. I am non-union, which makes me a traitor to the working class and an ally of big business. I am a Christian, which now labels me as an infidel. I believe in the 2nd Amendment, which now makes me a member of the vast gun lobby. I am older than 70 and retired, which makes me a useless old man. I think and I reason, therefore I doubt much that the main stream media tells me, which must make me a reactionary. I am proud of my heritage and our inclusive American culture, which makes me a xenophobe. I value my safety and that of my family and I appreciate the police and the legal system, which makes me a right-wing extremist. I believe in hard work, fair play, and fair compensation according to each individual’s merits, which today makes me an anti-socialist. I (and most of the folks I know), acquired a fair education without student loans (it’s called work) and no debt at graduation, which makes me some kind of an odd underachiever. I believe in the defense and protection of the homeland for and by all citizens, which now makes me a militant. Please help me come to terms with the new me… because I‘m just not sure who I am anymore! I would like to thank all my friends for sticking with me through these abrupt, new found changes in my life and my thinking! I just can’t imagine or understand what’s happened to me so quickly!

Few Words But Lots of Pictures – Think About It

quote-if-history-repeats-itself-and-the-unexpected-always-happens-how-incapable-must-man-be-of-learning-george-bernard-shaw-168845

12963843_1298798753468140_2556813948923951667_n

13082748_1059736300769264_928932130210656430_n

13133095_503880576482122_6395492697048802805_n

13178824_1068205469922347_479166386364348551_n

13164405_1011644538870918_8599621745500513762_n

12963944_1047814245294803_1717378630383560699_n

13173905_10157000056630093_3749169134840833296_n

12717373_1255252874489395_8900992768326086887_n

Freedom of Speech Mixed With Hypocrisy

There have been threats of boycotts of Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina because of criticism of state religious liberty measures being enacted. It seems, however, that the almighty dollar eases into first place when it comes to various vocal companies who, while they say they stand with the side of the gay, lesbian, transgender, and bisexual citizens of the United States, their work ethics seem to say otherwise. While these companies are actively threatening the above mentioned states, their companies are situated in countries that are most adamantly against the people they say they support. While these companies are using their freedoms of speech and choice, their actual business practices seem to show them turning a blind eye to reality.

Big corporations have come out to criticize state religious liberty measures in Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina as discriminating against those who aren’t heterosexual, some going as far as to propose boycotting states that enact such laws.

Unilever’s CEO said that many businesses would boycott Georgia’s HB 757 religious liberty bill if it were signed into law. BUT, Unilever has facilities in countries like Algeria and Tunisia that make homosexual activity illegal.

Microsoft company president said that he was very much opposed to Georgia’s HB 757 even as the company goes along with censorship policies in China.

An Intel CEO also in opposition to the pending Georgia HB 757 bill yet is working with Vietnam’s government which ‘bans all independent political parties, labor unions, and human rights organizations.’

Bruce Springsteen opted out of scheduled appearances in North Carolina in protest of recently enacted religious liberty laws. Did they remember that they organization has venues and hosts events in places like the United Arab Emirates who doesn’t share their stand on the religious liberty matter?

AMC Networks seems to be good at taking a stand for one side yet maintaining business practices with countries who are opposed to that stand. AMC broadcasts in Russia who enacted anti-gay laws.

Time Warner says the religious liberty bill in Georgia actually violates vales and inclusion and discrimination. Time Warner’s empire extends into Singapore which bans homosexual activity.

Walt Disney and Marvel Entertainment join the hypocritical companies claiming one thing and taking advantage of another. The Disney folks are investing billions into a theme park in Shanghai where this communist state has no laws protecting people from discrimination on gender identity. I wonder how they will call that park ‘the happiest place on earth’ except for depositing their financial take each day.

And a good, old power company, General Electric, taps in with their ‘sincere’ upset over the Mississippi ‘discriminatory law while still doing business in Saudi Arabia, a country where they provide jail time and lashings for using social media for meeting same-sex partners.

PayPal will be punishing North Carolina by canceling proposed plans for new business centers in Charlotte, North Carolina. North Carolina’s ‘bathroom law’, according to PayPal perpetuates discrimination which goes against the principles of their company . . . except, supposedly, when it comes to having service in Mauritania, Yemen, Somalia, and Saudi Arabia where homosexuality is punishable with death. In Nigeria, the punishment could be caning, death by stoning, or imprisonment.

Apple Inc. spoke out against Mississippi’s bill and the North Carolina bill. Their statement was, “Our future as Americans should be focused on inclusion and prosperity, and not discrimination and division.” Again, an outspoken company fails to think past their soapbox to realize that their ‘word’ doesn’t always extend past their profit margin. Another company in China, specifically, the Xinjiang region that has ethnic discrimination, religious repression and cultural suppression.

Netflix offers service to Libya. Enough said as we all know where that country stands on human right and freedom of religion.

The Sony empire is pledging to boycott Georgia over the disputed bill while also have an office in Kazakhstan where freedom of expression and peaceful assembly is restricted and punishable. So, if Sony wanted to stand up for what it is protesting in the United States over on Kazakhstan soil, it could be a problem?

(Basically, Mississippi signed a bill to protect ‘sincerely held religious beliefs or moral convictions’. HB 1523 would not limit any constitutionally protected rights or actions of any citizens of the state. North Carolina signed HB2 requiring individuals to use public restrooms that corespond to their biological sex.)

Disney Doesn’t Support Freedom of Religion?

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/03/23/disney-threatens-to-pull-all-film-projects-from-georgia-if-governor-signs-this-religious-liberty-bill/

It is getting to be that freedom of choice and religious freedom aren’t always free if the choices of the faithful are not politically correct.