Think, Research Before You Speak, Mrs. Bush!

Laura Bush made an impassioned remark about the Trump Administration problem in how they are being so horrible to the illegals coming over the border and the separation of children from their parents. Why, oh, why isn’t something being done!

This was clarified by Sarah Saunders quite clearly:

On Monday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders noted this during her news briefing.

“Frankly, this law was actually signed into effect in 2008 under (Laura Bush’s) husband’s leadership, not under this administration,” Sanders said, according to The Hill.

“We’re not the ones responsible for creating this problem. We’ve inherited it,” she added. “But we’re actually the first administration stepping up and trying to fix it.”

Perhaps, a little research on Mrs. Bush’s side would have prevented her looking rather foolish. Oh, and she could of asked her husband about it. He signed it into law.

 

Monday Morning Humor

When my daughter was around six years old, she was telling us about a saint she was reading about. She said the saint would levitate during Mass. Always the pragmatist, her little brother asked, “How high?”

My husband once asked, “What’s 16 x 16?” My then eight year old replied, “If it’s not on the times table chart (which goes to the twelves), I don’t think I need to know.”

A mom joined a non-denominational park day group. She was chatting with another mother and teasingly replied to a question, that she was a Druid. The other mom kind of pulled away and the joking mother said, “I’m just teasing! I’m really a Catholic!” The woman pulled back further and said, “Same difference!”

My eight year old was preparing for his First Confession. He said, “Let’s write down a list of my sins.” I asked if this was so he could remember them and he said, “No, I thought I would just give the list to Father

Reality Memories From Bygone Homeschooling Days!

When a new school year begins, we all anticipate great things being accomplished with our intellectually willing children. There are many things we would like to hear as we begin our studies but reality sets in all too soon.

1. Time for school! I thought we would take it easy today but several of you little darlings sent me private notes, begging to begin with math instead of art!

This is the third time I have called you to the school table! And you used up your art time yesterday when you crayoned your new math books.

2. Are you sure you wouldn’t like some fresh cookies and milk? It has been two hours since breakfast and you must be hungry. I promise we will still work on Geography afterwards.

No, you can’t have something to eat. You should have thought about hunger when you refused to eat breakfast this morning. Yes, you have to finish Geography and no ad-libbing on the maps today. No undiscovered countries that only you know about!

3. I can’t believe how neatly you set up your insect collections for science. And to think I only assigned this term project yesterday and here you are done already!

Smashed bugs don’t count for your bug collection even if you remember what it was before you squashed it. I don’t care if you weren’t the one who mashed the bug. You shouldn’t have put it in your sister’s bed to begin with!

4. How wonderfully you combined your poster paints to make a copy of one of the great Masterpieces! And you didn’t get a drop of paint on the floor, table or mommy’s art book.

Look, it is a numbered dot-to-dot coloring page. What do you mean you don’t understand the instructions?

5. Sweet child of mine! No wonder you asked for an extra two hours of school yesterday. You were busy composing this wonderful story for English class. Double-spaced and typewritten, no less.

A three-page composition doesn’t count if written in crayon! It was supposed to be on what we did on our summer vacation. And I did not spend it torturing you! But don’t give up on the idea – there is always next year!

by Barbara Barthelette

A Home Schooling Math Memory!

A real life school lesson . . .
Mom: Marc, Jane has 5 maps and . . .
Marc: What are maps?
Mom: Maps show the world. So, Jane has 5 maps and Hope has three maps . . .
Marc: What’s Hope?
Mom: A girl’s name.
Marc: Can Hope be a girl’s name?
Mom: Yes! Okay, Jane has 5 maps and Hope has 3 maps. How may maps . . .
Marc: What’s on the maps?
Mom: Countries of the world.
Marc: What countries?
Mom: They don’t say.
Marc: So, what do you think?
Mom: I think we had better figure out the problem!
Marc: The problem about what countries are on the map?
Mom: No, how many maps do both girls have together!
Marc: Jane is a girl’s name, too?
Mom: Yes! How many maps do Jane and Hope have all together?
Marc: Did you tell me how many each had?
Mom: Tell you what, let’s do phonics instead! Today we are learning the “J” sound. Okay, color all the pictures that begin with the sound of “J” like “Jane”.
Marc: Jane? How many maps does this Jane have?

Church and Children

Church and Children
By Barbara Barthelette

I am of the opinion that, if at all possible, families should be together at Mass, even with toddlers! This is not without some pitfalls so parents should be forewarned of the possibility of storms they may have to weather in the pursuit of a shared family Faith.

Remember, the longer you can keep your toddler from realizing that his legs can work on church property, the more attention you can pay to Mass. A sore back is little enough to bear in comparison to the exercise you may get chasing down an inquisitive child. At two and a half, my son discovered his church legs. His first escape took place in the Children’s Chapel a.k.a. the cry room at church. Initially unnoticed by the occupants, he dived under a row of folding chairs. We watched in anguish as each person popped up in surprise as he crawled under them.

Nursing mothers should start moving gradually back in the church as the baby grows older. I was sitting in the front row one Sunday when my hungry one year old obviously wanted to hear the sermon better. He threw back our privacy blanket much to my embarrassment and the priest’s surprise.

If all efforts at calming a child fails, do stand to the side of the church or in the back. I learned from experience, however, that you should take heed of your surroundings. Always make sure there is not a Holy Water font in the vicinity. They hold a lot of water in spite of their small appearance and they are easy to dump. You may know your skirt is soaked with blessed water. Other people may not be as charitable.

Four and five year olds should be prepared for Mass. Sometimes though it is better not to tell them too much in special circumstances. Julianna knew we were going to a funeral and her sole interest throughout the Mass was the ‘box’ up front. She was audibly verbal about, “I want to see inside now! Maybe he’s not inside! Let’s open it up now!

Sitting in the front row of the Children’s Chapel isn’t always a good idea. In some churches you will find that the congregation in the main body has a fish bowl view. . . and you are the fish! One Sunday I reached down to pick up one child who inadvertently pulled opened the front of my blouse as he climbed up. I immediately turned around only to have the second child flip up the back of my skirt.

You have to learn to ignore small disturbances. A crying baby is often helpful in covering up the name your child is calling the other one. You can be hopeful that the people in your immediate area are staring at you because they are in total awe of your parental management capabilities.

The discovery of manual dexterity almost always occurs during Mass when your two year old wears sneakers with velcro fastenings. The bells at Mass never quite cover this sound as your toddler gleefully opens and closes his shoes.
Always frisk your children before Mass. In the event a contraband fistful of marbles hit the floor during a particularly quiet moment during Mass, just keep staring prayerfully ahead and pretend you didn’t hear it.

The most import fact of life is this. . . There are only two parents to a family. When you exceed the one-to-one ratio with the arrival of your third child, you are on your own. Figure out your own rules!

Playing the Memories . . .

The priest stopped Mass when the cell phone went off, waiting for the person to turn it off. It kept beeping, buzzing, and ringing. The priest asked again. The noise continued. Finally, the priest narrowed it down to one woman in the congregation and said, “Would you please turn off your cell phone now?”! The woman calmly said, “My cell phone isn’t ringing . . . It’s my son’s Nintendo game.”!
We had a rat in our garage. We named him Willard and then went shopping for whatever it would take to close down Willard. A few days later, I was coming in the garage and there was Willard, passed on to his final reward. I called the children to view the body. My older daughter wanted to know why I wanted them to see a dead rat. Before I could say anything, she answered herself and said, “I guess it was to give us closure.”!
My  ten-year old daughter was working on a novel for English class. I asked if she would be done by the deadline I had set. She said, “Don’t worry. Tell me the day before and I will just kill all the characters off and end the story.”
Morning Mass must be a bit early for many. At the end of one Mass, the priest said, “Our Lady, Queen of Vocations . . .” and the congregation replied, “Pray for us.” Father then said, “Immaculate Mary, page 109.” And the obviously sleepy congregation replied, “Pray for us.”!
And once when attending Mass, the celebrant looked at the congregation across and said, “The Lord be with you.” One dear old lady looked at the other and explained helpfully, “That means ‘Dominus vobiscum’.”

Jesus CAN Solve ANY Problem.

There has always been something to be said about using your parental ‘outside voice’. Perhaps, if more parents exercised this gift in raising their children, Jesus might have a few more moments to enjoy His coffee!