Think, Research Before You Speak, Mrs. Bush!

Laura Bush made an impassioned remark about the Trump Administration problem in how they are being so horrible to the illegals coming over the border and the separation of children from their parents. Why, oh, why isn’t something being done!

This was clarified by Sarah Saunders quite clearly:

On Monday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders noted this during her news briefing.

“Frankly, this law was actually signed into effect in 2008 under (Laura Bush’s) husband’s leadership, not under this administration,” Sanders said, according to The Hill.

“We’re not the ones responsible for creating this problem. We’ve inherited it,” she added. “But we’re actually the first administration stepping up and trying to fix it.”

Perhaps, a little research on Mrs. Bush’s side would have prevented her looking rather foolish. Oh, and she could of asked her husband about it. He signed it into law.

 

Congressman Henry Hyde on the Irish Vote for Abortion 2018

On this most sorrowful day in Irish history.

“When the time comes, as it surely will, when we face that awesome moment, the final judgment, I’ve often thought, as Fulton Sheen wrote, that it is a terrible moment of loneliness. You have no advocates, you are there alone standing before God — and a terror will rip your soul like nothing you can imagine. But I really think that those in the pro-life movement will not be alone. I think there’ll be a chorus of voices that have never been heard in this world but are heard beautifully and clearly in the next world — and they will plead for everyone who has been in this movement. They will say to God, ‘Spare him, because he loved us!'”

Congressman Henry Hyde

Catholic Ireland Downgrades . . .

Tears of joy are being shed today in St. Patrick’s Ireland. I’m sure that if St. Patrick was still walking the Emerald Isles, he’d be crying today, too . . . but not for the same reason.

Hard as it is to believe, the excitement is over the legalization of killing babies in the womb. Women are rejoicing at finally having the choice to rid themselves of inconveniences aka babies. Why hasn’t any pro-abort woman ever stopped to think that while they want the freedom to be women with a choice over their body, they are often aborting as yet unborn females. Are they segregating themselves from a bunch of female-shaped fetal cells because they can’t see and hold those baby girls and refuse to even contemplate they might be doing away someone that would mean the world to them . . . BUT, only it was convenient.

Over the years, more and more proof (like any warm-blooded person really needed it) has come forth showing that babies in the womb hear you, respond to your voice and show up on ultrasounds as viable beings. Babies in the womb can also feel so being poisoned or ripped from limb to limb and dragged from the body of the only home they know up to then is a sad thought. God planned a much better welcome to the world for leaving the womb they called Mother for so long.

I wonder . . . do you think the snakes will come back to Ireland?

A Good Reminder – Author Unknown

I was holding a notice from my 13-year old son’s school announcing a meeting to preview the new course in sexuality. Parents could examine the curriculum and take part in an actual lesson presented exactly as it would be given to the students.

When I arrived at the school, I was surprised to discover only about a dozen parents there. As we waited for the presentation, I thumbed through page after page of instructions in the prevention of pregnancy or disease. I found abstinence mentioned only in passing. When the teacher arrived with the school nurse, she asked if there were any questions.

I asked why abstinence did not play a noticeable part in the material. What happened next was shocking. There was a great deal of laughter, and someone suggested that if I thought abstinence had any merit, I should go back to burying my head in the sand. The teacher and nurse said nothing as I drowned in a sea of embarrassment. My mind had gone blank, and I could think of nothing to say. The teacher explained to me that the job of the school was to teach “facts,” and the home was responsible for moral training.

I sat in silence for the next 20 minutes as the course was explained. The other parents seemed to give their unqualified support to the materials. “Donuts at the back,” announced the teacher during the break. “I’d like you to put on the name tags we have prepared – they’re right by the donuts – mingle with the other parents.” Everyone moved to the back of the room. As I watched them affixing their name tags and shaking hands, I sat deep in thought. I was ashamed that I had not been able to convince them to include a serious discussion of abstinence in the materials. I uttered a silent prayer for guidance.

My thoughts were interrupted by the teacher’s hand on my shoulder. “Won’t you join the others, Mr. Layton?” The nurse smiled sweetly at me. “The donuts are good.” “Thank you, no,” I replied. “Well, then how about a name tag? I’m sure the others would like to meet you.” “Somehow I doubt that,” I replied. “Won’t you please join them?” she coaxed. Then I heard a still small voice whisper, “Don’t go.” The instructions were unmistakable. “Don’t go!” “I’ll just wait here,” I said.

When the class was called back to order, the teacher looked around the long table and thanked everyone for putting on name tags. She ignored me. Then she said, “Now we’re going to give you the same lesson we’ll be giving your children. Everyone please peel off your name tags.” I watched in silence as the tags came off. “Now, then, on the back of one of the tags, I drew a tiny flower. Who has it please?” The gentleman across from me held it up. “Here it is!” “All right,” she said. “The flower represents disease. Do you recall with whom you shook hands?” He pointed to a couple of people. “Very good,” she replied. “The handshake in this case represents intimacy. So the two people you had contact with now have the disease.” There was laughter and joking among the parents. The teacher continued, “And whom did the two of you shake hands with?” The point was well taken, and she explained how this lesson would show students how quickly disease is spread. “Since we all shook hands, we all have the disease.”

It was then I head the still, small voice again. “Speak now,” it said, “but be humble.” I noted wryly the latter admonition, then rose from my chair. I apologized for any upset I might have caused earlier, congratulated the teacher on an excellent lesson that would impress the youth, and concluded by saying I had only one small point I wished to make. “Not all of us were infected,” I said. “One of us abstained.”