Congressman Henry Hyde on the Irish Vote for Abortion 2018

On this most sorrowful day in Irish history.

“When the time comes, as it surely will, when we face that awesome moment, the final judgment, I’ve often thought, as Fulton Sheen wrote, that it is a terrible moment of loneliness. You have no advocates, you are there alone standing before God — and a terror will rip your soul like nothing you can imagine. But I really think that those in the pro-life movement will not be alone. I think there’ll be a chorus of voices that have never been heard in this world but are heard beautifully and clearly in the next world — and they will plead for everyone who has been in this movement. They will say to God, ‘Spare him, because he loved us!'”

Congressman Henry Hyde

Catholic Ireland Downgrades . . .

Tears of joy are being shed today in St. Patrick’s Ireland. I’m sure that if St. Patrick was still walking the Emerald Isles, he’d be crying today, too . . . but not for the same reason.

Hard as it is to believe, the excitement is over the legalization of killing babies in the womb. Women are rejoicing at finally having the choice to rid themselves of inconveniences aka babies. Why hasn’t any pro-abort woman ever stopped to think that while they want the freedom to be women with a choice over their body, they are often aborting as yet unborn females. Are they segregating themselves from a bunch of female-shaped fetal cells because they can’t see and hold those baby girls and refuse to even contemplate they might be doing away someone that would mean the world to them . . . BUT, only it was convenient.

Over the years, more and more proof (like any warm-blooded person really needed it) has come forth showing that babies in the womb hear you, respond to your voice and show up on ultrasounds as viable beings. Babies in the womb can also feel so being poisoned or ripped from limb to limb and dragged from the body of the only home they know up to then is a sad thought. God planned a much better welcome to the world for leaving the womb they called Mother for so long.

I wonder . . . do you think the snakes will come back to Ireland?

Happy Birthday, Padre Pio!

May you continue to help us here on earth from your place in Heaven!

“Prayer is the best weapon we have; it is the key to God’s heart. You must speak to Jesus not only with your lips, but with your heart. In fact on certain occasions you should only speak to Him with your heart.”

“Have courage and do not fear the assaults of the Devil. Remember this forever; it is a healthy sign if the devil shouts and roars around your conscience, since this shows that he is not inside your will.”

“The most beautiful act of faith is the one made in darkness, in sacrifice, and with extreme effort.”

Husbands Take Note?

When our lawn mower broke and wouldn’t run, my wife kept hinting to me hat I should get it fixed. But, somehow I always had something else to take care of first, the truck, the car, playing golf – always something more important to me.
Finally she thought of a clever way to make her point. When I arrived home one day, I found her seated in the tall grass, busily snipping away with a tiny pair of sewing scissors. I watched silently for a short time and then went into the house. I was gone only a minute, and when I came out again I handed her a toothbrush.

I said, “When you finish cutting the grass, you might as well sweep the driveway.”

The doctors say I will walk again, but I will always have a limp

A Dialogue on Charity :-)

A Dialogue on Charity
by T. E. H.

Dramatis Personae:
Fr. Lan from Fooland (He insists it pronounced “fulland”) & Parishioner R. Hood

Fr. L: Mr. Hood! Why are you trying to start my car?

R.H.: Why father, I’m just trying to live up to your sermons. Didn’t you say last Sunday that if a poor person steals something from a rich person, there was no sin involved? That is was a positive good?

Fr. L: I certainly did and I stand by that. The obligations of Christian charity require that we have a preferential option for the poor. But since I’m not rich and you’re not poor, what does that have to do with my car?

R.H.: Well you certainly didn’t give us any way of deciding who was rich and who was poor. So, I checked on your salary and benefits and since you make more than me, that makes you richer and me poorer. So you’re rich and I’m poor.

Fr. L: That’s ridiculous! Besides, I never intended it to apply to you or me, but to the really rich and the really poor.

R.H.: You seem rich enough to me, and I certainly feel poor. And as you said in another sermon, feelings are what it’s all about.

Fr. L: I’m not going to bandy words with you anymore. Get out of my car or I’m calling the police.

R.H.: I’m shocked that you would willing collaborate with the um, what did you call them, oh yeah!, the tools of the American fascist regime. At least that’s what you called them when they were turning people over to the immigration service.

Fr. L: Just, get, out, of, my, car!

R.H.: Don’t have a fit, father, I’ll get out. I’ll even give you my key for the car. I’ll see if my son still has his key. He was a little tipsy when he came home last night and might have dropped it on the way into the house. Don’t worry, I gave him a good talking to about drinking and driving. He won’t do that again.

Fr. L: You mean that your rotten, no good, drugged out, bum of a son, has been driving my car?

R.H.: Sure father, he’s even poorer than I am.

Look, Ma! No Hands!

Look, Ma! No Hands!!
By Gino Galley

The issue I’m going to address here does not seem to be raised much in most Catholic discussions or periodicals. The reason, I’m guessing, is because the matter seems so minor, and even normal, to a large majority of Catholics in the U.S.A. that most of them do not even realize it is an issue at all!

It is a widespread practice (which somehow crept in) in the United States by which, during the recitation of the Lord’s Prayer in the Mass, everyone in the congregation would hold hands together. Ever since I started to attend Mass regularly (I am a convert to the Faith) I have seen this practice done regularly at my local parishes. Since everybody was doing it, I thought it was part of the liturgy, and so I innocently took part in it. I continued this liturgical feat for a couple of years more until, one day, I was listening to EWTN radio and heard Fr. Mitch Pacwa, a well-respected Jesuit priest and preacher for the Faith, speak on one of his talk shows; in it, he said that he said that he believed that holding hands during the Lord’s prayer is an illicit act in the Mass!

“What in Pete’s world is he saying?” I exclaimed to myself, “What’s so wrong about holding hands?” I did not understand, and so I went on the internet to research this claim using major (and authorized) Roman Catholic evangelization organizations such as Catholic Answers (www.catholic.com) and EWTN (www.ewtn.com). To my surprise, I found that the practice of holding hands during the Lord’s Prayer is indeed wrong; not in the action by itself, but in the fact that it is NOT part of the liturgy. That is, nowhere in the Roman Missal does it command or even mention such a gesture (compared to other gestures such as bowing during the Creed or making the sign of the cross for the gospels).

Though the Vatican has not addressed the issue directly, she has nonetheless used language that discourages holding hands in a document call the Notitiae, the official publication of the Sacred Congregation for the Sacraments and Divine Worship.

“The prolonged holding of hands [during the Lord’s prayer] is itself a sign of communion rather than of peace. Further, it is a liturgical gesture introduced spontaneously but on personal initiative; it is not in the rubrics.” (Notitiae 11 [1975] 226, DOL 1502, no. R29).

Furthermore, canon law prohibits any changes or additions to the liturgy:
“The liturgical books approved by the competent authority are to be faithfully observed in the celebration of the sacraments; therefore, no one on personal authority may add, remove, or change anything in them.” (CIC 846, para. 1).
Once again, the Vatican currently has only used words that discourage the practice; she has not yet issued any official decision whether it is approved or prohibited (compared to something like liturgical dancing, which she directly declared forbidden).

Personally, I believe since it is only a matter of custom (which is changeable) rather than of doctrine (which can never change) the Church can approve it if She sees it fit. But until then, and with due respect to those who do practice it, I choose to prayerfully keep my hands folded during the Our Father in obedience to the rubrics of the liturgy of the Mass. The liturgy which “no one on personal authority may add, remove, or change anything in them”.